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Analytic Geometry and Calculus

Large book cover: Analytic Geometry and Calculus

Analytic Geometry and Calculus
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Publisher: Ginn and Company
ISBN/ASIN: B007MHSU8S
Number of pages: 542

Description:
The first part of the book brings together all methods for the graphical representation of functions of one variable, both algebraic and transcendental. This has the effect of devoting the first part of the book to analytic geometry of two dimensions, the analytic geometry of three dimensions being treated later when it is required for the study of functions of two variables. The transition to the calculus is made early through the discussion of slope and area, the student being thus introduced in the first year of his course to the concepts of a derivative and a definite integral as the limit of a sum.

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