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Internet and Technology Law: A U.S. Perspective

Small book cover: Internet and Technology Law: A U.S. Perspective

Internet and Technology Law: A U.S. Perspective
by

Publisher: Bookboon
ISBN-13: 9788740308457
Number of pages: 154

Description:
This book reviews many of the legal challenges created by the new technologies. Topics include jurisdiction; privacy; copyright and trademark law; trade secrets and patents; free speech, defamation, and obscenity; and cybercrime.

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