Gliding Mammals: Taxonomy of Living and Extinct Species

Small book cover: Gliding Mammals: Taxonomy of Living and Extinct Species

Gliding Mammals: Taxonomy of Living and Extinct Species

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press
Number of pages: 126

There are 64 species of extant gliding mammals that are currently recognized, which are divided into six different families. These comprise eight species of gliding marsupials that live within Australasia and include six species of lesser gliding possums of Petaurus (family Petauridae), one species of greater glider of Petauroides (family Pseudocheiridae), and one species of feathertail glider of Acrobates (family Acrobatidae).

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