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An Introduction to Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

Small book cover: An Introduction to Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

An Introduction to Theoretical Fluid Dynamics
by

Publisher: New York University
Number of pages: 177

Description:
This course will deal with a mathematical idealization of common fluids such as air or water. The main idealization is embodied in the notion of a continuum and our 'fluids' will generally be identified with a certain connected set of points in RN, where we will consider dimension N to be 1, 2, or 3.

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