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Realism-Completeness-Universality interpretation of quantum mechanics

Small book cover: Realism-Completeness-Universality interpretation of quantum mechanics

Realism-Completeness-Universality interpretation of quantum mechanics
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 307

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The aim of the book is to give a consequent and mathematical formulation to the interpretation of quantum mechanics that is often met, mostly in some rough and naive form, among practical physicists. The ideas are carefully developed starting from the well-known textbook material so that the book ought to be accessible to students of theoretical physics that finished the standard course of quantum mechanics.

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