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Dream for Dead Bodies by M. Michelle Robinson

Large book cover: Dream for Dead Bodies

Dream for Dead Bodies
by

Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0472119818
ISBN-13: 9780472119813
Number of pages: 266

Description:
The book offers new arguments about the origins of detective fiction in the United States, tracing the lineage of the genre back to unexpected texts and uncovering how authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Mark Twain, Pauline Hopkins, and Rudolph Fisher made use of the genre's puzzle-elements to explore the shifting dynamics of race and labor in America.

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