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Why Icebergs Float: Exploring Science in Everyday Life

Large book cover: Why Icebergs Float: Exploring Science in Everyday Life

Why Icebergs Float: Exploring Science in Everyday Life
by

Publisher: UCL Press
ISBN/ASIN: 1911307037
ISBN-13: 9781911307037
Number of pages: 222

Description:
Andrew Morris takes examples from the science we see every day and uses them as entry points to explain a number of fundamental scientific concepts in ways that anyone can grasp. This book encourages us to reflect on our own relationship with science and serves as an important reminder of why we should continue learning as adults.

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