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Imagining Human Rights by Susanne Kaul, David Kim

Large book cover: Imagining Human Rights

Imagining Human Rights
by

Publisher: De Gruyter Open Ltd
ISBN/ASIN: 3110376199
Number of pages: 227

Description:
Why are human rights considered inviolable norms of justice although more than hundred countries around the globe violate them? This paradox seems reducible to the discrepancy between idealism and reality in humanitarian affairs, but Imagining Human Rights complicates this picture by offering interdisciplinary perspectives on the imaginary status of human rights on their power and limitation alike.

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