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Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene

Large book cover: Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene

Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene
by

Publisher: Open Humanities Press
ISBN-13: 9781607853299
Number of pages: 157

Description:
Even though the book is first and foremost concerned with life -- understood as both a biological and social phenomenon -- it is the narrative about the impending death of the human population (i.e., about the extinction of the human species), that provides a context for its argument. Anthropocene names a geo-historical period in which humans are said to have become the biggest threat to life on earth. However, rather than as a scientific descriptor, the term serves here primarily as an ethical injunction to think critically about human and nonhuman agency in the universe.

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