Logo

The Digital Rights Movement

Large book cover: The Digital Rights Movement

The Digital Rights Movement
by

Publisher: The MIT Press
ISBN-13: 9780262017954
Number of pages: 251

Description:
Postigo describes the legislative history of the DMCA and how policy 'blind spots' produced a law at odds with existing and emerging consumer practices. Yet the DMCA established a political and legal rationale brought to bear on digital media, the Internet, and other new technologies. Drawing on social movement theory and science and technology studies, Postigo presents case studies of resistance to increased control over digital media, describing a host of tactics that range from hacking to lobbying.

Home page url

Download or read it online for free here:
Download link
(16MB, PDF)

Similar books

Book cover: Intellectual Property RightsIntellectual Property Rights
by - U.S. Department of State
Intellectual property issues are getting more and more attention these days. It is worth spending some time considering how intellectual property rights (IPR) developed and what role they play in achieving widely shared objectives.
(12816 views)
Book cover: Free CultureFree Culture
by - Penguin Press HC
Never before have the big cultural monopolists used the fear created by new technologies to shrink the public domain of ideas, even as the same corporations use the same technologies to control more and more what we can and can't do with culture.
(13968 views)
Book cover: Intellectual Property Rights in an Age of Electronics and InformationIntellectual Property Rights in an Age of Electronics and Information
- U.S. Government Printing Office
This report examines the impact of recent advances in communication and information technologies on the intellectual property system. It focuses primarily on the Federal copyright system, and on the continuing effectiveness of copyright law ...
(4898 views)
Book cover: Digital CopyrightDigital Copyright
by - Michigan Publishing Services
Jessica Litman questions whether copyright laws crafted by lawyers and their lobbyists really make sense for the vast majority of us. Should every interaction between ordinary consumers and copyright-protected works be restricted by law?
(1275 views)