Logo

Evaluating Java for Game Development

Evaluating Java for Game Development
by


Number of pages: 314

Description:
This is a report of a graduate project. The purpose of this project was to examine whether the use of Java for games is advantageous compared to the current languages of choice, C and C++. This is not an easy question to answer, and as you will see in the report, the answer will depend on several project specific issues. The main target group of the report is professional game programmers with little or no knowledge of Java, who wonder whether Java would be beneficial in future projects. The report generally assumes that the reader is skeptical about Java. The focus of the report is on games intended for retail; not on Java applets.

Download or read it online for free here:
Download link
(1MB, PDF)

Similar books

Book cover: Killer Game Programming in JavaKiller Game Programming in Java
by - O'Reilly Media
This book is for people who already know the basics of Java. It teaches reusable techniques which can be pieced together to make lots of games. For example, how to make a particle system, first-person keyboard controls, a terrain follower, etc.
(12706 views)
Book cover: Free Java BookFree Java Book
by - Western State College
Enter the ACM Java libary. This library made it possible to teach simple graphics and arcade game programming to students with no prior programming experience. But the students are still learning real coding and real Java.
(7140 views)
Book cover: Java: Graphical User InterfacesJava: Graphical User Interfaces
by - BookBoon
This introductory book is the third part of the 'Java'-series written by David Etheridge. This volume gives the reader an introduction to Input/Output Packages, Streams, Iterators, Graphical User Interface (GUI) and much more.
(12145 views)
Book cover: Pro Java 6 3D Game DevelopmentPro Java 6 3D Game Development
by - Apress
Pro Java 6 3D Game Development explains how to program 3D games in Java on a PC, with an emphasis on the construction of 3D landscapes. The author assumes you have a reasonable knowledge of Java, the sort of thing picked up in a first Java course.
(11515 views)