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Introduction to Quantum Mechanics with Applications to Chemistry

Large book cover: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics with Applications to Chemistry

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics with Applications to Chemistry
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Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN/ASIN: 0070489602
ISBN-13: 9780070489608
Number of pages: 568

Description:
This widely adopted undergraduate-level text applies quantum mechanics to a broad range of chemical and physical problems, covering such subjects as wave functions for the hydrogen atom, perturbation theory, the Pauli exclusion principle, and the structure of simple and complex molecules. Numerous tables and figures.

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