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How to Observe in Archaeology

Large book cover: How to Observe in Archaeology

How to Observe in Archaeology
by

Publisher: British Museum
ISBN/ASIN: B001SLVBRQ
Number of pages: 102

Description:
This handbook is intended primarily for the use of travelers in the Near and Middle East who are interested in antiquities without being already trained archaeologists. Much knowledge is lost because it comes in the way of those who do not know how to profit by it or to record it. Accordingly, it has been thought that a handbook of elementary information and advice may be found of service by travelers with archaeological tastes; and the Trustees of the British Museum have undertaken the publication of it.

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