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The Descent of Man by Charles Darwin

Large book cover: The Descent of Man

The Descent of Man
by

Publisher: eBooks@Adelaide
ISBN/ASIN: 0452288886
ISBN-13: 9780452288881

Description:
The Descent of Man, Darwin's second landmark work on evolutionary theory (following The Origin of the Species), marked a turning point in the history of science with its modern vision of human nature as the product of evolution. Darwin argued that the noblest features of humans, such as language and morality, were the result of the same natural processes that produced iris petals and scorpion tails.

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