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Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics

Small book cover: Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics

Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics
by

Publisher: Rice University
Number of pages: 105

Description:
This course aims to make students aware of the physical origins of the main partial differential equations of classical mathematical physics, including the fundamental equations of fluid and solid mechanics, thermodynamics, and classical electrodynamics. These equations form the backbone of modern engineering and many of the sciences, and solving them numerically is a central topic in scientific computation.

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