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A Simple Introduction to Particle Physics

Small book cover: A Simple Introduction to Particle Physics

A Simple Introduction to Particle Physics
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Publisher: arXiv

Description:
A brief introduction to the relevant mathematical and physical ideas that form the foundation of Particle Physics, including Group Theory, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Field Theory and Interactions, Abelian and Non-Abelian Gauge Theory, and the SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) Gauge Theory that describes our universe apart from gravity. These notes are intended for a student who has completed the standard undergraduate physics and mathematics courses.

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