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Mechanics and Special Relativity

Small book cover: Mechanics and Special Relativity

Mechanics and Special Relativity
by

Publisher: Harvard College
Number of pages: 203

Description:
Newtonian mechanics and special relativity for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics at the level of the advanced placement curriculum. Topics include an introduction to Lagrangian mechanics, Noether's theorem, special relativity, collisions and scattering, rotational motion, angular momentum, torque, the moment of inertia tensor, oscillators damped and driven, gravitation, planetary motion, and an introduction to cosmology.

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