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The basic paradoxes of statistical classical physics and quantum mechanics

Small book cover: The basic paradoxes of statistical classical physics and quantum mechanics

The basic paradoxes of statistical classical physics and quantum mechanics
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 180

Description:
The statistical classical mechanics and the quantum mechanics are two developed and well-known theories. Nevertheless, they contain a number of paradoxes. It forces many scientists to doubt internal consistency of these theories. However the given paradoxes can be resolved within the framework of the existing physics, without introduction of new laws.

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