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Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics for Linguistics

Small book cover: Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics for Linguistics

Introduction to Probability Theory and Statistics for Linguistics
by

Publisher: UCLA
Number of pages: 137

Description:
Contents: Basic Probability Theory (Probability Spaces, Conditional Probability, Random Variables, Expected Word Length, Limit Theorems); Elements of Statistics (Estimators, Tests, Distributions, Correlation and Covariance, Linear Regression, Markov Chains); Probabilistic Linguistics (Probabilistic Regular Languages and Hidden Markov Models).

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