Logo

Free At Last: The U.S. Civil Rights Movement

Large book cover: Free At Last: The U.S. Civil Rights Movement

Free At Last: The U.S. Civil Rights Movement
by

Publisher: U. S. Department of State
ISBN/ASIN: B004P8JP22
Number of pages: 72

Description:
This book recounts how African-American slaves and their descendants struggled to win -- both in law and in practice -- the civil rights enjoyed by other Americans. It is a story of dignified persistence and struggle, a story that produced great heroes and heroines, and one that ultimately succeeded by forcing Americans to confront squarely the shameful gap between their universal principles of equality and justice and the inequality, injustice, and oppression faced by millions of their fellow citizens.

Download or read it online for free here:
Download link
(6.4MB, PDF)

Similar books

Book cover: Sages and Heroes of the American RevolutionSages and Heroes of the American Revolution
by - Moss & Brother
This book contains the condensed substance of more expensive works that have been published relative to the men and times of the American Revolution. The character and acts of the most prominent Sages and Heroes of that eventful era are delineated.
(4638 views)
Book cover: The Roosevelt MythThe Roosevelt Myth
by - Devin-Adair
Roosevelt is the most sainted president of the 20th century. But as John T. Flynn noted in this volume, FDR actually prolonged the Great Depression and deliberately dragged the country into a war that seriously compromised American liberties.
(8783 views)
Book cover: The Presidents: A Reference HistoryThe Presidents: A Reference History
by - Advameg, Inc.
This a standard resource for students and the general public alike: U.S. presidents from George Washington to George W. Bush are profiled in depth. This is the story of the national political leadership of the country during the nearly two centuries.
(11000 views)
Book cover: Outline of U.S. HistoryOutline of U.S. History
by - Nova Science
A chronological look at how the United States took shape -- from its origins as an obscure set of colonies on the Atlantic coast a little more than 200 years ago into what one political analyst today calls the first universal nation.
(8745 views)