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Introduction to Physical Astronomy

Small book cover: Introduction to Physical Astronomy

Introduction to Physical Astronomy
by

Publisher: University of Cincinnati

Description:
Table of Contents: Preface; Some History; Distance vs. Direction; Electromagnetic Waves; Astronomical Observation; Image Processing; Spectra; The Solar System; Motion in the Solar System; Solar System Dynamics; The Sun; Stellar Populations; Elementary Particles; Nuclear Reactions; Stellar Evolution; Spacetime; Black Holes; Galaxies; Expansion of the Universe; Dark Matter; Cosmology; Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation; Extraterrestrial Life.

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