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How to Use Your Mind by Harry D. Kitson

Large book cover: How to Use Your Mind

How to Use Your Mind
by

Publisher: J. B. Lippincott company
ISBN/ASIN: 1481808966
Number of pages: 127

Description:
A psychology of study: being a manual for the use of students and teachers in the administration of supervised study. Topics covered: Improving concentration; Improving memory; Habit formation; Thinking rationally; Reading with increased awareness; Motivating yourself to work; Creating the ideal work environment; Dealing with plateaus in learning; Ideal lifestyle for health and energy.

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