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A Gentle Introduction to Tensors

Small book cover: A Gentle Introduction to Tensors

A Gentle Introduction to Tensors
by

Publisher: Technion
Number of pages: 87

Description:
The book discusses constant tensors and constant linear transformations, tensor fields and curvilinear coordinates, and extends tensor theory to spaces other than vector spaces, namely manifolds. This document was written for the benefits of Engineering students.

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