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Whose History? Engaging History Students through Historical Fiction

Small book cover: Whose History? Engaging History Students through Historical Fiction

Whose History? Engaging History Students through Historical Fiction
by

Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
ISBN-13: 9781922064516
Number of pages: 283

Description:
'Whose History?' aims to illustrate how historical novels and their related genres may be used as an engaging teacher/learning strategy for student teachers in pre-service teacher education courses. The book examines the traditions in Australian historical fiction.

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