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Can Human Rights Survive? by Conor Gearty

Large book cover: Can Human Rights Survive?

Can Human Rights Survive?
by

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0521685524
ISBN-13: 9780521685528
Number of pages: 192

Description:
In this set of three essays, originally presented as the 2005 Hamlyn Lectures, Conor Gearty considers whether human rights can survive the challenges of the war on terror, the revival of political religion, and the steady erosion of the world's natural resources. He also looks deeper than this to consider the fundamental question: How can we tell what human rights are?

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