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The Future of Remote Sensing From Space

Large book cover: The Future of Remote Sensing From Space

The Future of Remote Sensing From Space

Publisher: U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment
ISBN/ASIN: 0160418844
ISBN-13: 9780160418846
Number of pages: 213

Description:
This report, the first of three in a broad OTA assessment of Earth observation systems, examines issues related to the development and operation of publicly funded U.S. and foreign civilian remote sensing systems. It also explores the military and intelligence use of data gathered by civilian satellites. In addition, the report examines the outlook for privately funded and operated remote sensing systems.

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