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Human Brain

Small book cover: Human Brain

Human Brain

Publisher: Wikipedia

Description:
The human brain has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but has a more developed cortex than any other. Despite being protected by the thick bones of the skull, suspended in cerebrospinal fluid, and isolated from the bloodstream by the blood–brain barrier, the human brain is susceptible to damage and disease.

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