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Physical Mathematics by Michael P. Brenner

Small book cover: Physical Mathematics

Physical Mathematics
by

Publisher: Harvard University
Number of pages: 250

Description:
The goal of this course is to give a modern introduction to mathematical methods for solving hard mathematics problems that arise in the sciences -- physical, biological and social. Our aim therefore is to teach, within a broad suite of examples, how computer simulations and analytical calculations can be effectively combined. In this course, we will begin with problems that are simple polynomial equations and first order differential equations -- and slowly march our way towards the study nonlinear partial differential equations.

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