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An Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp

Small book cover: An Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp

An Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp
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Publisher: Free Software Foundation, Inc.
Number of pages: 314

Description:
This is an introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp, for people who are not programmers. Although Emacs Lisp is usually thought of in association only with Emacs, it is a full computer programming language. You can use Emacs Lisp as you would any other programming language. This introduction to Emacs Lisp is designed to get you started: to guide you in learning the fundamentals of programming, and more importantly, to show you how you can teach yourself to go further.

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