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Introduction to the Field Theory of Classical and Quantum Phase Transitions

Small book cover: Introduction to the Field Theory of Classical and Quantum Phase Transitions

Introduction to the Field Theory of Classical and Quantum Phase Transitions
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 178

Description:
These lecture notes provide a relatively self-contained introduction to field theoretic methods employed in the study of classical and quantum phase transitions. Classical phase transitions occur at a regime where quantum fluctuations do not play an important role, usually at high enough temperatures.

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