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Introduction to the Standard Model of the Electro-Weak Interactions

Small book cover: Introduction to the Standard Model of the Electro-Weak Interactions

Introduction to the Standard Model of the Electro-Weak Interactions
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 44

Description:
These are the notes of a set of four lectures which I gave at the 2012 CERN Summer School of Particle Physics. They cover the basic ideas of gauge symmetries and the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breaking which are used in the construction of the Standard Model of the Electro-Weak Interactions.

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