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A Photographic Atlas of Rock Breakdown Features in Geomorphic Environments

Small book cover: A Photographic Atlas of Rock Breakdown Features in Geomorphic Environments

A Photographic Atlas of Rock Breakdown Features in Geomorphic Environments
by

Publisher: Planetary Science Institute
ISBN/ASIN: 0978523601
Number of pages: 88

Description:
A comprehensive image collection of rock breakdown features observed on boulders. This atlas is intended as a tool for planetary geoscientists and their students to assist in identifying surface features found on rocks on planetary surfaces.

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