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Technical Guide to Managing Ground Water Resources

Small book cover: Technical Guide to Managing Ground Water Resources

Technical Guide to Managing Ground Water Resources
by

Publisher: US Forest Service
Number of pages: 295

Description:
The effects of many human activities on ground water resources and on the broader environment need to be clearly understood in order to properly manage these systems. Throughout this technical guide, we emphasize that development, disruption, or contamination of ground water resources has consequences for hydrological systems and related environmental systems.

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