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Lecture notes in fluid mechanics: From basics to the millennium problem

Small book cover: Lecture notes in fluid mechanics: From basics to the millennium problem

Lecture notes in fluid mechanics: From basics to the millennium problem
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 67

Description:
These lecture notes have been prepared as a first course in fluid mechanics up to the presentation of the millennium problem listed by the Clay Mathematical Institute. With this document, our primary goal is to debunk this beautiful problem as much as possible.

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