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Introduction to Physics for Mathematicians

Introduction to Physics for Mathematicians
by


Number of pages: 285

Description:
A set of class notes in Introduction to Physics taken by math graduate students. The goal of this course was to introduce some basic concepts from theoretical physics which play so fundamental role in a recent intermarriage between physics and pure mathematics. No physical background was assumed.

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