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Solution Methods In Computational Fluid Dynamics

Small book cover: Solution Methods In Computational Fluid Dynamics

Solution Methods In Computational Fluid Dynamics
by

Publisher: NASA
Number of pages: 90

Description:
Implicit finite difference schemes for solving two dimensional and three dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations will be addressed. The methods are demonstrated in fully vectorized codes for a CRAY type architecture. We shall concentrate on the Beam and Warming implicit approximate factorization algorithm in generalized coordinates.

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