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Electricity and Magnetism by J. B. Tatum

Electricity and Magnetism
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The contents: Electric Fields; Electrostatic Potential; Dipole and Quadrupole Moments; Batteries, Resistors and Ohm's Law; Capacitors; The Magnetic Effect of an Electric Current; Force on a Current in a Magnetic Field; On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies; Magnetic Potential; Electromagnetic Induction; Properties of Magnetic Materials; Alternating Current; Laplace Transforms; Maxwell's Equations; CGS Electricity and Magnetism; Magnetic Dipole Moment.

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