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Why are Braids Orderable? by Patrick Dehornoy, at al.

Small book cover: Why are Braids Orderable?

Why are Braids Orderable?
by


Number of pages: 206

Description:
In the decade since the discovery that Artin's braid groups enjoy a left-invariant linear ordering, several quite different approaches have been applied to understand this phenomenon. This book is an account of those approaches, involving self-distributive algebra, uniform finite trees, combinatorial group theory, mapping class groups, laminations, and hyperbolic geometry.

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