Logo

The Geometry of General Relativity

Small book cover: The Geometry of General Relativity

The Geometry of General Relativity
by

Publisher: Oregon State University
Number of pages: 158

Description:
The manuscript emphasizes the use of differential forms, rather than tensors, which are barely mentioned. The focus is on the basic examples, namely the Schwarzschild black hole and the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models. The material should be suitable for both advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in both mathematics and physics.

Home page url

Download or read it online for free here:
Read online
(online html)

Similar books

Book cover: Vector Analysis and the Theory of RelativityVector Analysis and the Theory of Relativity
by - Johns Hopkins press
This monograph is the outcome of lectures delivered to the graduate department of mathematics of The Johns Hopkins University. Considerations of space have made it somewhat condensed in form, but the mode of presentation is sufficiently novel.
(15056 views)
Book cover: The Mathematical Theory of RelativityThe Mathematical Theory of Relativity
by - Cambridge University Press
Sir Arthur Eddington here formulates mathematically his conception of the world of physics derived from the theory of relativity. The argument is developed in a form which throws light on the origin and significance of the great laws of physics.
(5766 views)
Book cover: Mathematical RelativityMathematical Relativity
by - arXiv
These are lecture notes written for a one-semester course in mathematical relativity aimed at mathematics and physics students. Not meant as an introduction to general relativity, but rather as a complementary, more advanced text.
(657 views)
Book cover: Spacetime Geometry and General RelativitySpacetime Geometry and General Relativity
by - King's College London
This course is meant as introduction to what is widely considered to be the most beautiful and imaginative physical theory ever devised: General Relativity. It is assumed that you have a reasonable knowledge of Special Relativity as well as tensors.
(9325 views)