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Advanced Data Analysis from an Elementary Point of View

Small book cover: Advanced Data Analysis from an Elementary Point of View

Advanced Data Analysis from an Elementary Point of View
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Number of pages: 586

Description:
This is a draft textbook on data analysis methods, intended for a one-semester course for advance undergraduate students who have already taken classes in probability, mathematical statistics, and linear regression. It began as the lecture notes for 36-402 at Carnegie Mellon University.

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