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Computational Turbulent Incompressible Flow

Large book cover: Computational Turbulent Incompressible Flow

Computational Turbulent Incompressible Flow
by

Publisher: Springer
ISBN/ASIN: 3540465316
ISBN-13: 9783540465317
Number of pages: 415

Description:
In this book we address mathematical modeling of turbulent fluid flow, and its many mysteries that have haunted scientist over the centuries; such as the dAlembert mystery of drag in an inviscid flow, the Sommerfeld mystery of transition to turbulence in shear flow, and the Loschmidt mystery of violation of the 2nd law of thermodynamics.

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