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Computability and Complexity from a Programming Perspective

Large book cover: Computability and Complexity from a Programming Perspective

Computability and Complexity from a Programming Perspective
by

Publisher: The MIT Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0262100649
ISBN-13: 9780262100649
Number of pages: 485

Description:
The author's goal as an educator and author is to build a bridge between computability and complexity theory and other areas of computer science, especially programming. Jones uses concepts familiar from programming languages to make computability and complexity more accessible to computer scientists and more applicable to practical programming problems.

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