The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons

Large book cover: The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons

The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons

Publisher: Hoover Institution Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0817944729
ISBN-13: 9780817944728
Number of pages: 134

The authors review the main policy issues surrounding nonproliferation of nuclear weapons. They address the specific actions that the community of nations should take to confront and turn back the nuclear danger that imperils humanity. The nuclear genie, say the authors, cannot be put back in the bottle. Our most urgent task as a nation today is to successfully manage, contain, and reduce the grave danger of nuclear weapons.

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