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Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics

Small book cover: Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics

Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics
by

Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 198

Description:
These lecture notes are aimed at mathematicians and physicists alike. It is not meant as an introductory course to PDEs, but rather gives an overview of how to view and solve differential equations that are common in physics. Among others, I cover Hamilton's equations, variations of the Schroedinger equation, the heat equation, the wave equation and Maxwell's equations.

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